Burkina Faso 2005

Africa

Yearbook 2005

Burkina Faso. With just over 80% of the vote, President Blaise Compaoré was re-elected on November 13. Compaoré has ruled Burkina Faso since he took power in a coup in 1987. He had already served two terms of office as elected leader and, according to a rule from 2000, could not really stand for election to a third term. However, the Constitutional Court, with judges appointed by the president himself, granted Compaoré the right to participate in the presidential election because his first term in office had passed when the law change took place.

According to countryaah, Ouagadougou is the capital and one of the major cities within the country of Burkina Faso. Eleven presidential candidates from the divided opposition stood against the incumbent president. Parts of the opposition felt that Compaore’s candidacy was a violation of the Constitution. He was also criticized for using huge sums for his election campaign. An opposition leader boycotted the election, while the leader of the largest opposition party, Gilbert Ouédraogo, did not stand by himself but chose to support Compaoré. His explanation was that no party alone can solve the country’s “enormous problems”.

About 1 million people in northern Burkina Faso suffered from food shortages in the fall as a result of drought and grasshoppers, which hit neighboring Niger even more severely. Many people in the countryside were forced to survive on grass and milk from the few goats that were not self-killed or sold. The victims were helped by, among others, the UN Food Agency WFP.

Sangoulé Lamizana, coup general and president 1966-80 in Upper Volta (named Burkina Faso until 1984), died in May 89 years old.

October

At least 20 killed in new jihadist acts

October 14

At least 20 people are reported to have been killed by jihadists in three villages in the Seno province of northern Burkina Faso. Even more people are missing after the attacks. The government condemns the act and says that security personnel have been deployed in the three villages.

The Election Commission approves 13 presidential candidates

October 8

Burkina Faso’s Electoral Commission gives 13 candidates the go-ahead to run in the November 22 presidential election. A single woman, Kam Yeli Monique, is among the candidates. Eight candidates are rejected because they have not received the fee they have to pay to participate or the 50 signatures from elected politicians required. A final decision on who may stand up will soon be given by the Constitutional Council. At the same time, observers express concern that around 400,000 voters in the northern and eastern parts of the country have not been able to register due to the lack of security. This is considered to benefit President Roch Marc Christian Kaboré because it is in this part of the country that dissatisfaction with his government is greatest.