Map of Gambia Banjul

Gambia 2005

Africa

Yearbook 2005

Gambia 2005

The Gambia. According to countryaah, Banjul is the capital and one of the major cities within the country of Gambia. Two ministers and 17 high-ranking officials were dismissed in March after suspicions of corruption in their ministries and government works. President Yahya Jammeh initiated a campaign against bribery in the public administration in 2004 since Gambia was designated as one of the world’s most corrupt countries. One of the dismissed ministers resumed his ministry without further explanation after six months.

  • Also see abbreviationfinder.org for how the acronym GA stands for the country of Gambia and other meanings of this two-letter abbreviation.

Map of Gambia Banjul

In August, Gambia doubled ticket prices for ferries across the Gambia River, triggering an economic conflict with Senegal, where traffic between the country’s north and south is heavily dependent on the shortcut through Gambia. Freight traffic to the Gambia was blocked and Senegalese began boycotting the Gambian ferries. The conflict lasted for two months, until the Gambia agreed to withdraw the price increase after international mediation.

Population

Made up of Sudanese ethnic groups (Mandingo 34.1%, Fula 16.2%, Wolof 12.6%, Jola 9.2% etc.), it is distributed rather evenly along the river, albeit with an evident densification towards the mouth, where the capital Banjul is located. The latter, together with other towns, mostly located in the immediate hinterland, brings the urbanization rate of the country to around 57% (2008). The centers located along the river artery generally have administrative and commercial functions; the villages of the savannah, on the other hand, only practice agriculture. The living conditions of the population are very backward and this situation is confirmed by the trend of socio-demographic indicators: according to 2009 estimates, life expectancy at birth is just over 55 years, well over half of the adult population is illiterate and infant mortality is around 67.33 ‰. The very shape of the country helps to hinder the process of economic growth and infrastructure of the territory: in fact, even today, the only way of penetration is represented by the homonymous watercourse. The strong demographic increase and the scarcity of arable space, largely destined for the commercial production of peanuts, tend to progressively aggravate food dependence from abroad.

The population speaks local dialects, even if the official language is English; from the religious point of view, Muslims by far prevail (94.9% of the total), with minorities of Christians, both Protestants and Catholics.