Map of Ghana Accra

Ghana 2005

Africa

Yearbook 2005

Ghana 2005

Ghana. Since the closure of Ghana Airways in February after major losses, Ghana was without a national airline until October, when Ghana International Airlines (GIA) made its maiden flight between Accra and London on an hired plane. GIA is owned by 70% by the state and 30% by a US-Ghanaian consortium. While it was a source of national pride that the country’s flag again adorned aircraft in foreign traffic, one MP complained that neither food, drink nor entertainment on board had any connection to Ghana.

According to countryaah, Accra is the capital and one of the major cities within the country of Ghana. Ghana is one of the countries in West Africa that has the lowest prevalence of HIV/AIDS and succeeded in lowering the frequency of infection from 2005 to 3.6% of the population of sexually active age to 3.1%. In January, the government allocated approximately SEK 45 million over two years to make brake medicines accessible to more people.

  • Also see abbreviationfinder.org for how the acronym GH stands for the country of Ghana and other meanings of this two-letter abbreviation.

Map of Ghana Accra

A political quarrel erupted in December when the government decided to build a new presidential palace with the help of a US $ 30 million loan from India. The government considered it inappropriate to allow the president to live in a house where slaves were previously housed. The opposition thought the money could be better spent.

With the constitution that came into force on 1 July 1960, with which a presidential republic was established, the government of President Nkrumah, leader undisputed of the Convention People’s Party (CPP), accentuated its authoritarian character, while trying to continue the ambitious program of economic development, also through unpopular measures that aroused reactions in the population (strike of railway workers and dockers in September 1961). The dissent of Nkrumah’s “socialist” policy spread and led to the resignations of some ministers (KA Gbedemah, K. Botsio and K. Edusei). Nkrumah – who was wounded in an attack in an attack in Kulungulu, a northern village in August 1962 – continued to cope with arrests and trials. At the acquittal, in December 1963, of some alleged guilty parties (T. Adamafio, former Minister of Information, A. Adjei, former Minister of Foreign Affairs, and HH Cofie-Crabbe, former administrative secretary of the party) Nkrumah reacted by dismissing the president of the court, A. Korsah. The definitive consolidation of the regime was sanctioned by constitutional amendments approved by a referendum in January 1964 (in the same month Nkrumah suffered another attack): the president obtained the power to dismiss the judges of the Supreme Court or of the High Courts and the Convention People’s Party was institutionalized as a single party. In February 1965, a special court sentenced the three ministers, previously acquitted, while JB Danquah, a well-known member of the opposition, was detained – according to the very discretionary rules of the Preventive detention act of 1958 – from October 1961. to June 1962 and again from January 1964. The renewal of the National Assembly in June 1965 was no more than a formality (the single list of candidates had been drawn up by the Central Committee of the party).

In foreign policy, Nkrumah was the most convinced advocate of Pan-Africanism and positive neutralism at the same time: the 1st Conference of Independent African States was held in Accra in April 1958 and the 1st Pan-African Conference of Peoples in December; on November 23, 1958 the union between the Ghana and Guinea, which, however, did not have any concrete development, even if Mali joined it in 1960. In 1960 the Ghana he was among the promoters of the “Casablanca group”, the so-called “revolutionary Africa” ​​(in the same year he established relations with the People’s Republic of China). With neighboring states, the Ghana he had some disputes: with the Upper Volta he disputed for the demarcation of a border section, with the Ivory Coast he was for a long time in controversy for the support given by the Ghana to the Sanwi separatist movement, with Togo for the purpose of unifying (within Ghana) the Ewe population; relations with Cameroon and Zaire were marred by the help provided by the Ghana to internal dissident movements. At the Addis Ababa conference (May 1963) Nkrumah still strongly advocated the political unification of Africa; but this perspective was abandoned precisely with the establishment of the Organization of African Unity. However, radical pan-Africanism did not often prevent a different pragmatic attitude while neutralism allowed the Ghana to solicit huge aid from Eastern and Western countries.