Map of San Marino San Marino

San Marino 2005

Europe

Yearbook 2005

San Marino 2005

San Marino. According to countryaah, San Marino is the capital and one of the major cities within the country of San Marino. In March, San Marino’s parliament approved an agreement with the EU on the taxation of savings accounts for non-residents. In addition, a declaration of intent was adopted with the aim of protecting its own financial system when integrated with the Union.

  • Also see abbreviationfinder.org for how the acronym SM stands for the country of San Marino and other meanings of this two-letter abbreviation.

Map of San Marino San Marino

SAN MARINO. – In 1977 the population of the tiny state was 20,400. (4628 in the capital). The greatest economic income is made up of tourism; during 1977 there were 2,564,532 visitors. The center-left coalition, which governed the country since the electoral consultations of 1959, was reconfirmed by the votes for the Grand Council (8 September 1974) even if the results showed a regression of the Christian Democratic and Social Democratic Party, however compensated from the success of the Socialist Party, the third formation of the center-left coalition. The Communist Party has achieved slight progress and the seats are distributed as follows: Christian Democrats 25, Socialists 8, Social Democrats 9, Freedom Movement 1, Communists 15, People’s Democratic Party 1, Committee for the Defense of the Republic 1. A law passed in November 1973 put an end to discrimination against women in public offices and in the control of personal property: four of them were elected to Parliament, and C. Boscaglia was appointed Minister of Public Works. In foreign policy there are meetings with the Italian delegation to connect the problems inherent to economic development (Sen. Fanfani, then Prime Minister, was the first Italian head of government to go on an official visit to SM in 1960) and the visit that a delegation from the small republic made to Beijing in October 1972. The delegation, led by the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs G. Ghironzi,

In domestic politics, the country has suffered from the repercussions of the economic crisis that has hit Italy in recent years. While the essential characteristics of the structure of social services remained unchanged, the budget deficit was such that a tax reform was necessary. On the political level, the contrast between the Christian Democrats and the Socialists who made up the center-left junta was accentuated. In 1975, the so-called hundred-day crisis occurred when the socialists asked the Christian Democrats for a strengthening of relations with the trade unions and greater openness to the communists, through the establishment of political-parliamentary commissions accessible to all parties. The tension that throughout 1976 characterized the relations between the two parties making up the majority resulted in the government crisis in November 1977 that put an end to the collaboration between Christian Democrats and Socialists. While the Communist Party has clearly expressed its willingness to join the ruling coalition together with the Christian Democrats, the Socialist Party, advocating the idea of ​​a single party of the left, has called for a broad coalition government. In December 1977 the Captains regent, after the Christian Democratic renunciation to form the government due to the blockade of the left who asked for the entry of the Communists in the majority, conferred the task on the Communists. While the three left-wing parties occupy half of the sixty seats of the Great and General Council (communists 16, socialists 9, unitary socialists 5), the formation of a majority was difficult. On 29 December the Communists, due to the intransigent Christian Democratic opposition, gave up their post: and the Captains regent, after a quick round of consultations, entrusted it to the Socialists. These, having ascertained the impossibility of creating a large majority coalition, gave up in turn, making the hypothesis of early electoral consultations increasingly concrete.