Map of Seychelles Victoria

Seychelles 2005

Africa

Yearbook 2005

Seychelles 2005

Seychelles. In January, the government announced that the authorities should develop a warning system to minimize the damage caused by natural disasters. The reason was the tsunami in the Indian Ocean December 26, 2004. The disaster caused extensive material damage in the Seychelles, located about 500 miles from Sumatra where the severe earthquake earthquake occurred and which in turn caused the tidal wave. Only two people died in Seychelles, which was because the authorities managed to warn tourists and residents despite the fact that there was no developed system for it. The tsunami caused damage to the infrastructure for the equivalent of over US $ 30 million. In addition, the coral reef was damaged, especially on the northern and eastern sides of the islands.

In November, Parliament passed a new investment law, prepared for several years. The purpose of the law is to increase investment and increase the security of domestic and foreign investors. In recent years, Seychelles has suffered from a lack of investment and growth has been very weak.

According to countryaah, Victoria is the capital and one of the major cities within the country of Seychelles. The Seychelles laughter was previously close to extinction, but after efforts by the government and environmental organizations, the bird, found only in the Seychelles, is no longer threatened. In 2005, the BirdLife International organization moved the species down from the category “acutely threatened” to “severely threatened”. The Seychelles dwarf tomb, which was declared extinct in the 1950s, has also recovered.

  • Also see abbreviationfinder.org for how the acronym SC stands for the country of Seychelles and other meanings of this two-letter abbreviation.

Map of Seychelles Victoria

History. – After long negotiations with Great Britain, on June 29, 1976 the Seychelles became an independent republic, a member of the Commonwealth. Leadership of the country was assumed by a coalition government comprising the two main parties, the Seychelles Democratic Party and the Seychelles Unified People’s Party. The leaders of the two parties, J. Mancham and A. René, assumed the positions of President of the Republic and Prime Minister respectively. In the agreements that sanctioned the independence, Great Britain returned to the Seychelles the islands of Aldabra, Farquhar and Desroches, from 1965 part of the British Indian Ocean Territories and then leased to the United States. In June 1977 René, in a coup d’état, dismissed Mancham, assumed the post of head of state, dissolved the National Assembly and suspended the Constitution. In May 1978 René founded the Progressive People’s Front of the Seychelles, into which his old party merged, and in March 1979, with a new socialist-inspired Constitution, he created a one-party state. In June 1979 the legislative and presidential elections ratified the new political order,

The following years were marked by a long series of coup attempts involving foreign mercenaries, mostly South African, and groups of opponents in exile, many of whom were killed in terrorist attacks abroad. The new regime established privileged relations with Tanzania, which also offered defensive support, and engaged in a policy of non-alignment and support for movements aimed at creating a ” peace zone ” in the Indian Ocean. Already re-elected in 1984, René was reappointed to the presidency in 1989, while the opposition gave birth to the Democratic Unity Movement in London in 1991 under the leadership of M. Ferrari. During 1991, also thanks to pressure from France and Great Britain (main donor countries), René started a process of democratization, which allowed the opposition to organize themselves freely and the exiles to return to their homeland. In July 1992, elections were held to form a Commission in charge of drafting a new constitution, in which the President’s Party won 58.4% of the votes, while the New Democratic Party (later the Democratic Party), led by the former president Mancham, won 33.7%, and the other opposition party, Party of Seychelles (or Seselwa Party), led by Anglican pastor W. Ramkalawal, 4.4%. In September, however, the Democratic Party withdrew its delegation from the Commission on the grounds that members of the majority prevented a serious debate on the reforms. The draft Constitution text did not obtain in the November referendum the 60% of ” yes ” necessary for its approval. A new Constitution, in the preparation of which the Democratic Party also participated, was ratified by a referendum on June 18, 1993 with 73.6% of the votes in favor, despite opposition from the Seychelles Party. It envisaged a multi-party regime and the establishment of a National Assembly composed of 33 deputies, 22 of whom directly elected and the remainder appointed by the individual parties based on the votes obtained (only those parties that have reached at least 9% of the votes). The presidential term was set for a term of 5 years, renewable 3 times. The legislative elections held in July 1993 saw the victory of René’s Progressive People’s Front of the Seychelles, which won 56.5% of the vote, while the Democratic Party got 32.3% and the United Opposition – a new party that it brought together several opposition movements including the Party of Seychelles – 9.7%. The presidential elections, held the same day, confirmed René in office.